How to Become a Quality Control Analyst

Quality Control Analyst
Quality Control Analyst Key Stats
Avg. Salary / year$44,810
Avg. Pay / hour$21.54
Education0-1 Year
Outlook-18%

These professionals are experienced in using a variety of information and analyzing it in order to determine any product or procedure irregularities.

A Quality Control Analyst provides their expertise and knowledge in a wide range of industries.

The following is a short list of industries that typically hire these professionals to perform quality control analysis.

  • Nonprofit
  • Government
  • Pharmaceutical
  • Educational
  • Professional Services
  • Scientific Services
  • Technical Services

The exact duties for a Quality Control Analyst depend on the industry they work in.

For the most part, these professionals evaluate products, procedures or services that a company offers to make sure they provide the highest possible benefits to their clients or patrons.

Continue reading the information below if you have the skills and passion to be a Quality Control Analyst.

Below you will find information regarding the education requirements needed to enter this profession as well as a general job description, salary and wage information and the projected job growth.

Education Requirements to Become a Quality Control Analyst

Candidates who want to become a Quality Control Analyst must have a superior knowledge of scientific principles.

Students need a minimum of a Bachelor’s degree in order to become a Quality Control Analyst.

Specific degrees will depend on the type of work or industry a student wants to go into for example, candidates who want to work in the nonprofit, educational or government sectors should choose a major from the following list:

  • Social Work
  • Social Welfare
  • Criminal Justice
  • Psychology
  • Sociology
  • Education

Candidates choosing to go into the sciences such as Biotechnology, Manufacturing or Pharmaceuticals should focus on a science track in order to acquire a Bachelor of Science.

These candidates should major in Biology, Chemistry or Engineering.

Candidates who want to pursue a managerial or senior position should pursue an advanced degree.

A Master’s degree will suffice in order to become a Quality Control Analyst at the senior level.

In addition to this advanced degree, candidates should focus on strengthening their skills with good laboratory practice (GLP) as well as good manufacturing process (GMP).

Quality Control Analyst Job Description

A Quality Control Analyst is responsible for making sure that a product, service or procedure that their organization offers meets industry and company standards.

They do this by performing a variety of analysis procedures on raw materials used to create products, evaluation of a final product and the production process used by fellow colleagues.

A Quality Control Analyst not working for a company that produces a tangible object, such as a phone company, will use different types of data.

They begin by compiling information regarding the process currently being used.

They take the data to perform an analysis report and then create documentation related to the analysis.

Finally, they report any problems or the final results to senior officials.

The gathered data and analysis is also used to measure against industry standards or government regulations.

Depending on a final analysis, a Quality Control Analyst or their supervisor can make recommendations to revise and improve operating procedures.

Quality Control Analyst Salary and Career Path

According to Salary.com, annual median income for Quality Control Analysts is in the $40,000 to $45,000 range.

Exact wage and salary figures will depend on the industry a Quality Control Analyst works in as well as years of experience and geographical location.

Quality Control Analyst careers are projected to grow at an average pace when compared to other professions.

Job opportunities are expected to grow by 7 to 13 percent through the year 2018.

The industries that hire the most Quality Control Analysts include the educational services who hire approximately 35 percent of workers.

The professional, scientific and technical services industries hire 24 percent of workers while the government sector hires approximately 19 percent of professionals.

Candidates who pursue an advanced degree such as Master’s will have more advancement opportunities.

Candidates holding a minimum of a Master’s degree are more likely to be promoted to senior level positions.

However, candidates wanting to attain senior level should gain some experience in their field before seeking advancement.

BLSThe below information is based on the 2021 BLS national averages.

  • Annually
  • Monthly
  • Hourly

National Average Salary

$44,810
$28K
$31K
$44K
$49K
$62K
10%
25%
50%
75%
90%

Average Salary by State

StateAvg. Annual Salary
Alabama$36,850
Alaska$72,200
Arizona$47,710
Arkansas$39,020
California$47,280
Colorado$48,170
Connecticut$54,450
Delaware$47,690
District of Columbia$53,920
Florida$44,610
Georgia$40,150
Hawaii$57,370
Idaho$41,430
Illinois$43,850
Indiana$44,490
Iowa$44,340
Kansas$46,830
Kentucky$41,330
Louisiana$51,060
Maine$46,500
Maryland$53,500
Massachusetts$51,050
Michigan$40,130
Minnesota$46,000
Mississippi$38,360
Missouri$46,130
Montana$48,990
Nebraska$45,390
Nevada$50,780
New Hampshire$47,980
New Jersey$45,510
New Mexico$48,460
New York$46,820
North Carolina$40,380
North Dakota$69,010
Ohio$43,300
Oklahoma$44,620
Oregon$47,780
Pennsylvania$44,770
Rhode Island$47,110
South Carolina$39,630
South Dakota$42,470
Tennessee$41,230
Texas$43,200
Utah$48,940
Vermont$44,450
Virginia$44,220
Washington$60,130
West Virginia$45,610
Wisconsin$42,470
Wyoming$54,530
Guam$41,580
Puerto Rico$31,660
Virgin Islands$56,100

The top earning state in the field is Alaska, where the average salary is $72,200.

These are the top 5 earning states in the field:

Alaska - $72,200
North Dakota - $69,010
Washington - $60,130
Hawaii - $57,370
Virgin Islands - $56,100
* Salary information based on the May 2021 Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) Survey for Inspectors, Testers, Sorters, Samplers, and Weighers, OCC Code 51-9061, BLS.
* Employment conditions in your area may vary.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a quality control analyst?

Quality control analysts, also known as quality control inspectors, examine products to ensure that production standards are met.

Their work typically consists of reading blueprints and specifications, monitoring operations and inspecting products, and recommending adjustments.

Quality control analysts monitor nearly all manufactured products, from foods and textiles to motor vehicles and computers.

Although some quality control analysts still use hand-held devices, they usually rely on electronic inspection equipment, such as 3D scanners.

Some firms have completely automated the process of quality control.

In these firms, inspectors monitor the quality control equipment installed at several points in the production process and conduct random product checks.

Most quality control inspectors work during regular business hours but in some cases, they may have to work during weekends or evenings.

Quality control analysts need a variety of skills, including dexterity, math, technical and mechanical skills, physical stamina and strength.

How much does a quality control analyst make?

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual wage for quality control analysts was $32,250 in May 2018.

Salaries vary depending on the industry where the quality control analysts work.

Those employed in administrative and support services earned a median annual wage of around $30,000, while those who work in professional, scientific, and technical services earned around $41,000 a year.

How much does it cost to become a quality control analyst?

Most quality control analysts need at least a high school diploma and receive on-the-job training.

Getting a diploma in industrial trades from a trade school can give you better job prospects.

On average a trade school costs around $33,000 but tuition costs vary widely, depending on the school, the program you choose and the duration.

Training for this type of job typically means learning how to use special meters, gauges, computers and other instruments.

Most employers also train their new quality control analysts in quality control techniques, such as Six Sigma, blueprint reading, and safety.

Because many manufacturers use automated techniques, most quality control analysts must learn how to use and program the equipment.

What is the demand for quality control analysts?

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the employment of quality control inspectors is expected to decline 18 percent.

This decline is explained by the fact that many manufacturers have replaced manual inspections with automated inspection processes thus reducing the demand for quality control analysts.

However, sometimes inspection by hand is still required, especially for products that are tested for taste or smell, texture or performance.

How long does it take to become a quality control analyst?

Most quality control analysts need at least a high school diploma and receive on-the-job training.

The training period can last anywhere between 1 month to 1 year.

Graduating from a trade school can give you better job prospects; most trade school programs can be completed in less than 2 years.

Because most employers use automated techniques you may also have to learn how to use new equipment and technologies.

Jamie Willis