How To Start An Acting Career

How To Start An Acting Career

Starting out in the acting profession can be frightening at first. There are so many options that it might be tough to know where to begin.

This article will outline the most popular, however, keep in mind that it is not an exhaustive list. It can be challenging if you do not have industry connections.

It is, nevertheless, not impossible, and no one should deter you from following your dream career in show biz if you think you have what it takes to make it.

How To Start An Acting Career

Learn The Craft

Just like any other line of work, acting requires a lot of learning. So, you’ll need to be as prepared as possible before diving straight into the audition process.

But don’t panic, there are many different ways to gain valuable acting skills and experience, even if you weren’t one of those kids that were thrown into acting school before they could walk.

There are countless college courses out there that could help get you on the right track, but local acting classes can be super helpful too, especially if you have zero acting experience.

But it’s important to never stop learning. Just like any other skill, you’ll need to keep practicing acting often to stay on top of new trends and to weed out any bad habits.

Signing up for a successful workshop or scene rehearsal class is one of the finest opportunities to understand the craft and meet other performers.

Classes can be a sanctuary for your development, providing a secure place to take risks and identify hidden skills, as well as appetizing your artistic demands while you’re still honing your craft.

Pick a few instructors you can trust so you may ask them questions and engage in a relaxed setting.

Keep Your Day Job

It’s not a good idea to quit your stable day job and run away to Hollywood with dreams of making it as a big actor, this just doesn’t happen. When you’re just starting out, the work is likely to be few and far between, so don’t expect a stable income.

So, As an aspiring actor, you would have to be able to attend classes and auditions when they are scheduled. However, unless you’re extraordinarily fortunate, you’ll have to work.

Consider a flexible day job for this purpose—personal assistant positions, fast food jobs, or event staffing firms are all great choices.

Having said that, make absolutely sure your day job is at least mildly pleasurable. If you’re going to be spending 40 hours per week doing something which isn’t your passion, make it a comfortable experience.

Or even better, try to track down a job where you can collaborate with other creative people so you can stay focused on your artistic aspirations.

Start Networking

You’ll want to start communicating with other individuals in the profession as fast as possible, just like you would in any other field. Get on a shoot as an extra through an extras casting agency.

While this isn’t lucrative work and probably not as glamorous as you imagined, it’s a wonderful opportunity to remind yourself that the individuals doing this work are simply regular people, rather untouchable superhumans.

It’s essential to interact with others while you’re there. Swap stories and find out what the routes of other performers look like.

There is no “one method” to get into the field of acting, and each performer has a unique tale to tell. However, speaking with each of them will give you a better picture of the possibilities open to you.

Snap A Killer Headshot

You should have a quality headshot as soon as you start throwing yourself out there. The great news is that there is plenty of competition, so you won’t have to pay hundreds for a snapshot.

It’s possible that you already know a decent photographer, and maybe one of your friends could help you out.

If you don’t know anyone willing to take a free headshot, ask around in your acting classes to see if anyone could recommend a cheaper alternative.

Your headshots should not be overly staged, photoshopped, or cluttered and should not portray anything besides who you really are.

Bring a variety of outfit options in attractive colors and designs that make you feel comfortable and happy, as well as a device to play the music that motivates you and gets you into the right headspace to have your picture taken.

Also, spend some time deciding on the look you want. Most portrait photographers can assist you with this, but you’ll need a playful promotional shot, a serious dramatic one, and a variety of other pictures that emphasize the characters you believe you can portray.

Do some research on the internet to uncover samples of contemporary headshot trends.

Practise Auditioning

To begin securing gigs, you’ll need to learn how to audition, and signing up for casting classes is a great method to do so.

Such two-hour workshops put you in front of real producers and directors and are a great way to learn how to be at ease in the audition room. (Auditions may also come directly from these meetings on occasion, but don’t go in expecting one)

However, they can be costly, so do your homework and spend your money sensibly. Likewise, ask your classmates for recommendations for good seminars and talent agencies to meet with. These courses can be quite beneficial in terms of expanding your network and honing your audition abilities.

Find An Agent

When you apply for acting gigs, agents will frequently request to see you in production or view your showreel. This is a typical catch-22 scenario because you need an agency to acquire roles and auditions.

So, how are you supposed to find an agency when you lack experience, and when you need an agent to gain experience?

That is not always the case; some people get lucky when hunting for agents. It is doable to get hired if you can put together a showreel with several pals, if agents attend seminars, or if you know someone who is an agent. But most people aren’t this lucky.

So, If you don’t have any acting experience, start small and start local. You can move up the ladder once you’ve accumulated enough credits.

Getting an agent is a huge step toward being an actor, but it doesn’t mean you should rely on them to do all of your work for you. Be a go-getter who creates their own opportunities.

Put In The Work

Even if you’re lucky enough to have an agent, they’re not going to do all of the work for you. You have to be prepared to fail, as almost everyone does at some point. Rejection is a key part of the journey to becoming a successful actor, and you have to be prepared to experience it.

When you audition, there is so much that is beyond your control and nothing you do can promise a job. Even if you established the role, there’s no assurance that you’ll get the job.

Rejection is a persistent obstacle that the performer must overcome. Resilience is an important quality for actors to cultivate, and riding the storms of optimism and despair is something you can become extremely adept at.

Having said that, there are few better feelings than when everything goes as planned and you get the job.

Don’t Lose Hope

Keeping your focus on your final ambitions while working to make a living can be a persistent difficulty when chasing your dreams.

The desire for safety and stability may derail even the most talented artist, and the desire for a fine car and clothes can prevent people from realizing their full potential.

So, if this is actually important to your job, you’ll need to prioritize, reserving your extra cash for classes and headshots rather than meals and vacations.

But you’ll also need to look after yourself. Keep uplifting, inspirational music on your phone or in your car. When you start to feel a bad day coming on, take a forced dancing break or a joyous sing-a-long.

Associate yourself with others who are on the same journey as you or who appreciate your difficulties.

To get your mind in the proper place, go for a stroll and enjoy the sunshine on your face. Take a bath, open a novel, and do whatever you need to do to feel significant and joyful right now.

Try to remember how lucky you are to be in the position to chase your acting dreams. If you’ve read this far, it’s clear that you have the desire and motivation to make it work, so don’t give up on yourself!

Jamie Willis