How To Start A Boxing Career

How-To-Start-A-Boxing-Career

Working as a professional boxer will require you to be in prime physical condition and you should also have a deepened insight into the moves of boxing.

As such, you should have developed your reputation and skillset in the field of boxing where others will want to pay to watch you fight.

Therefore, you should be prepared to train for a number of years within a boxing club setting in order to enhance your skillet and obtain the relevant licenses.

Once you are ready to compete at a professional level, your medical status, age and fitness levels will collectively determine whether you are able to fight professionally.

It is also common for boxing careers to be short-lived as boxers usually fight at their best when they’re at the optimum age and physical condition to do so.

However, you can still make a substantial amount of money during this period of time if you are able to build a strong reputation and you can also become a boxing coach after you have retired. 

What Is Required?

Whilst boxers are renowned for fighting in a ring, their career also involves a consistent training routine as a boxing club in order to maintain optimum fitness levels.

Additionally, they will need to practice their boxing moves with regularity in order to cement and learn new routines whilst meeting with their coaches to obtain advice and discover alternative ways to improve prior to their next match.

Sparring with their peers prior to matches helps them to implement these new skills and routines.

Prior to competing, boxers may also consult with their coaches to learn about the rules that have been attributed to the match in question and to discuss a variety of tactics that can enable them to win.

During a boxing match, boxers will use a variety of stances and punches in order to hit their opponent effectively whilst guarding themselves at the same time.

It is highly common for boxers to study their previous matches in order to derive a training plan that can combat their weaknesses and utilize their strengths.

Therefore, in order to become a successful boxer and develop a professional career, a boxer will need to have developed quickened reflexes, good eyesight and a high level of physical strength in order to compete.

What Is A Boxing Education? 

The process of developing a boxing career will begin with undergoing extensive training at a boxing gym.

This training will inherently teach a boxer to move in different ways in order to avoid injuries that may occur and aspiring boxers typically start training from a very young age in order to obtain optimum fitness and build their skills for professional fights.

This training also includes amateur fights that build a boxers competence until they are able to obtain a license to fight in professional matches.

These licenses often require a boxer to be at least 18 years old with proof of a credible medical examination that has determined the boxer’s fitness.

After they have passed this examination, they will be handed an identification card from a professional association and be associated alongside a manager who can certify their ability.

Associating with a boxing club or team is the best way to build a boxing career and obtain opportunities to fight on an amateur and professional level. 

The amount that boxers can make financially will depend on how much they are paid for individual matches and can also be determined by their weight class, experience and reputation.

Since professional boxers often gain celebrity status, their wages can increase significantly. The annual income for athletes has been determined as $51,370 with top professional boxers earning over $208,000 per annum on average. 

The Boxing Industry

Whilst most boxing matches will occur within event venues, boxers will spend the vast majority of their time at boxing clubs on training in certain gyms. They also work alongside other boxers in order to enhance their skills and develop their practice.

There is not a set work schedule but their coaches will often set regular training times for weekly practice. When they have an oncoming professional match, most boxers will train for extensively long hours including on weekends.

They will also be required to travel to event venues across the world and spend time away from loved ones. Boxers also face the risk of serious health injuries, often associated with the head and ribs and can spend a large amount of time in recovery thereafter. 

The Boxing Experience

Boxing expertise is built up over a number of years and most professional boxers usually earn a lower rate per fight that can drastically increase with sponsorship and a strong reputation.

Those boxers who build a strong reputation and who fight in key competitions can earn an incredible high fee per fight. Those who are at the very top of the boxing game can earn millions per gift and in 1990, Floyd Mayweather Jr. earned $250 million when fighting Manny Pacquiao.

As boxing has a heavy physical toll, a boxer’s peak performance can only last for a certain period of time and the vast majority of boxers will have short-lived careers before opting for an early retirement.

If they wish to stay within the field, they have the option of working as boxing coaches or alongside sponsors. Some boxers will focus on philanthropy work after retiring and utilize their reputation to help others. 

Conclusion

To conclude, making a career out of boxing requires years of dedication and effort in order to build the relevant skills and reputation that is required.

Professional boxers should expect a period of intense competition during the early stages of their careers in order to stand out from the crowd and obtain bigger fights, sponsorship deals and other endorsements.

Jamie Willis