How to Become a County Assessor
County Assessor Careers & Degrees

County Assessors work on behalf of a local government assuring real estate property is classified in a correct manner.

This process is an important step in order to determine the precise amount of property taxes an owner would need to pay on a biannual or annual basis.

If you feel you want to make the steps to become a County Assessor , continue reading below to learn the education requirements, a general job description, salary information and the future job outlook.

Education Requirements to Become a County Assessor

In order for candidates to become a County Assessor, they have to follow protocol implemented by their state government.

However, most County Assessors have a Bachelor’s degree and are required to be licensed or take a certification exam.

There is no specific course of study that someone who wants to become a County Assessor needs to complete.

However, majoring in Business Administration can help a candidate stand out; some specialties a student can pursue include Real Estate or Finance.

If a candidate decides on a different course of study, they can strengthen their academic background by taking some of the following courses: economics, real estate law, business, computer science, English, Mathematics and finance.

Licensure and certification requirements depend on the state you reside in.

A state assessor board is the entity responsible for setting state standards and requirements.

In some states, a local assessor board is responsible for setting standards.

Researching your state assessor board is the best way to determine exact requirements.

In general, states require certification candidates to go to an accredited university or college, take some fundamental assessing courses and pass a state mandated licensing exam.

Some states also require certification candidates to fulfill a predetermined amount of time training in the field in order to qualify to take the certification exam.

County Assessor Job Description

A County Assessor is responsible for appraising and assessing a property in order to determine its value.

This procedure is important in order to establish the correct amount of taxes that the property owner would need to pay.

A County Assessor would be responsible for appraising and assessing several types of properties.

Some common types of property that need appraisals include agricultural and residential properties.

Depending on the area a County Assessor works in, they may provide appraisals for entire neighborhoods all at once.

They can do this by using a procedure created to perform mass appraisals.

This procedure can be implemented with the help of computer systems and programs.

In the case a property owner contests an appraisal the County Assessor would need to use a single property procedure in order to resolve the challenge.

Some counties and jurisdictions have a predetermined schedule created to provide reevaluations and a County Assessor would need to appraise according to the timetable.

A County Assessor would then confirm and certify the appraisal after the reevaluation.

After a reevaluation and reassessment, a County Assessor would be responsible for contacting the property owner regarding the updated assessment.

They may contact property owners by mailing notices and details regarding the final assessment.

One important aspect of a County Assessor’s job is to be fully knowledgeable of tax assessment procedures in case property owners request further information regarding the assessment.

In some cases, a County Assessor would have to defend their assessment and be able to explain their process.

In addition to the appraising and assessing duties, a County Assessor would also be responsible for administrative and clerical duties.

County Assessor Salary and Career Path

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2008 the national median wage for Real Estate Assessors and Appraisers is approximately $47,000 per year.

The salary range for these professionals is approximately $25,900 to $88,600.

Assessors working for a county government make less income than those who work independently as contractors.

The median income for these professionals is approximately $43,500 per year.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics also reports that the job outlook for all Assessor careers will grow at slow pace.

Employment is expected to grow at about 5% through the year 2018.Employment growth is directly related to how strong the real estate market is.

The below information is based on the 2019 BLS national averages.
  • Annually
  • Monthly
  • Hourly

National Average Salary

$63,610
$31K
$41K
$63K
$78K
$104K
10%
25%
50%
75%
90%

Average Salary by State

StateAvg. Annual Salary
Alabama$57,110
Alaska$80,160
Arizona$46,990
Arkansas$43,470
California$85,970
Colorado$77,580
Connecticut$74,340
Delaware$54,640
District of Columbia$97,200
Florida$55,050
Georgia$55,570
Hawaii$67,240
Idaho$55,930
Illinois$53,590
Indiana$51,700
Iowa$71,840
Kansas$57,520
Kentucky$60,290
Louisiana$58,020
Maine$61,810
Maryland$60,640
Massachusetts$73,530
Michigan$54,300
Minnesota$72,550
Mississippi$54,470
Missouri$52,500
Montana$48,060
Nebraska- NA -
Nevada- NA -
New Hampshire$75,260
New Jersey$75,950
New Mexico$50,410
New York$65,380
North Carolina$60,100
North Dakota$53,080
Ohio$74,810
Oklahoma$52,160
Oregon$73,690
Pennsylvania$59,400
Rhode Island$68,110
South Carolina$53,540
South Dakota$47,630
Tennessee$54,220
Texas$63,970
Utah$58,730
Vermont$59,250
Virginia$61,940
Washington$79,080
West Virginia$40,360
Wisconsin$64,020
Wyoming$56,230
Puerto Rico$40,400

The top earning state in the field is District of Columbia, where the average salary is $97,200.

These are the top 5 earning states in the field:

District of Columbia - $97,200
California - $85,970
Alaska - $80,160
Washington - $79,080
Colorado - $77,580
* Salary information based on the May 2019 Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) Survey for Property Appraisers and Assessors, OCC Code 13-2020, BLS.
* Employment conditions in your area may vary.

Frequently Asked Questions

QuestionWhat does a county assessor do?

A county assessor is someone who determines the amount of property taxes the owner would have to pay every year.

These people are, in most cases, elected officials.

County assessors determine the amount of taxes by analyzing the conditions and characteristics of a wide range of properties and by reviewing property sales, as well as price trends.

Depending on the size of the county for which the assessors are employed, they would either be part of a team of elected assessors or not.

The main responsibility of county assessors is to report taxable values to government officials and to the public.

A county assessor is also responsible for defending the property values he or she has determined.

QuestionHow much do county assessors make?

On average, a county assessor can make a little less than $60.000 per year in the United States.

In case you decide to choose this career path, you can expect to earn anywhere between $37.000 and $100.000 annually.

The salary would certainly depend on a variety of factors – your education and experience level, the location, the number of clients, and so on.

An entry-level county assessor can earn around $15.50 per hour, while a top-level specialist with plenty of experience can make $26 and more.

QuestionHow much does it cost to become a county assessor?

The requirements to become a county assessor vary greatly by state.

However, in most cases, you would need a bachelor’s degree in economics, finance, business or a related field, in order to become a county assessor.

A year in a university can cost you anywhere between $8.000 and $45.000 (and more); the cost depends on a variety of factors (the books, supplies, and accommodation expenses are not included).

You might be required to have a license when working on federally related transactions; appraisal licensing education courses may cost over a thousand dollars.

QuestionWhat is the demand for county assessors?

The county assessor job market is expected to grow by 14% between 2016 and 2026, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

That is faster than the national average for all occupations in the United States.

The market of county assessors is competitive; nowadays, new technology is being used to assess real estate value, however, the concerns are mainly targeted at real estate appraisers.

QuestionHow long does it take to become a county assessor?

You would need 4 years to obtain a bachelor’s degree in business, finance or a related field.

Requirements certainly do vary by state, but you might need to be state-certified or licensed.

To get a license, you would, most likely, need to spend 200 hours in the classroom and acquire 2.500 hours of on-the-job experience.

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