Search:
 

Home > Education and Teaching > How to Become a Physical Education Teacher

how to become a Physical Education Teacher
 
      
 

How to Become a Physical Education Teacher



If you love sports, working out, and would like to work in education, then you might like to become a physical education teacher. Physical education teachers, also called gym teachers or PE teachers, teach classes to students where they complete sporting activities and also learn about the body, health, and well-being.

As society works to fight obesity, the role of the physical education teachers is more important than ever. Teaching new sports to kids can be great fun, but teachers also have the opportunity to show students how to best look after their own health, to eat well, and keep active. Teaching can be challenging, but making a difference to your students can be rewarding.

A good gym teacher will have excellent communication skills. You'll need them to help you explain new concepts to kids, and to be respected by your students. You will also need to be approachable, and also a figure of respect for your students.

Education Requirements to Become a Physical Education Teacher



To become a physical education teacher you will need a college education. A four year undergraduate degree in physical education or human movement is ideal. During your sophomore year, most colleges will allow you to enter an education specialty where you will learn teaching and also take part in classroom practice.

If you already have a degree that relates to sports or human movement, you will be able to enroll in a postgraduate teaching program. These courses will allow you to learn teaching methodology and fulfill the licensing requirements within your state.

In all states you must be a licensed teacher to work in a public schools, while private schools have their own requirements for teachers. Licensing requires you to have completed an accredited degree program, supervised practice and also to have taken math and literacy exams.

Each states have different requirements for licensure, you can view specific requirements at the NCATE website.

Physical Education Teacher Job Description



When you become a physical education teacher your duties are a little different from other classroom teachers. You will spend a lot of your time teaching classes in the school gym or outside. You will also have grading and paperwork to complete. Preparing lesson plans is also another part of the role. A physical education teacher will often coordinate sporting events and competitions, and coach school teams.

Here are some of the tasks of a physical education teacher:

  • Lesson planning

  • Sports classes

  • Teaching new skills

  • Marking papers and assignments

  • Disciplining students who require it

  • Writing report cards

  • Attending staff meetings

  • Communicating with parents

  • Communicating with other teaching staff

  • Coaching school teams

  • Organizing sports events


Physical Education Teacher Salary and Career Path



When you become a physical education teacher you can look forward to a rewarding career with a good income. A starting teacher in a public school makes around $35,000 to $40,000 a year depending on location. More experienced teachers will make closer to the median range of $47,000 to $51,000 a year. The top 10% of teachers earn over $75,000 a year.

In the private school system teachers get paid less, however they may get free or low-cost housing and other benefits.

Some jobs that are similar to a physical education teacher that might interest you include:

  • Math teacher

  • High school teacher

  • College professor

  • Paraprofessional

  • Librarian

  • Sports agent

  • Middle school teacher


When you become a physical education teacher you can look forward to a satisfying career educating your students about a subject you are passionate about. There is a secure job and a good salary available for qualified candidates.
 
 
 
 
 
 

*Salary Information provided by the Bureau Of Labor Statistics
2010 becomeopedia.com. All rights reserved